Pain Management

Bone substitutes are frequently used in clinical practice but often exhibit limited osteoinductivity. We hypothesized that unfocused shockwaves enhance the osteoinductivity of bone substitutes and improve osteointegration and angiogenesis.

Objective: Osteoarthritis is a painful, chronic joint disease affecting man and animals with no known curative therapies. Palliative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used but they cause adverse side effects prompting the search for safer alternatives. To address this need, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of avocado/soybean unsaponifiables (ASU), glucosamine (GLU), and chondroitin sulfate (CS) with or without the NSAID carprofen.

Vitacoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, is approved for the relief of pain and inflammation associated with orthopedic surgery and osteoarthritis in dogs.

In the current study, a chronic toxicity research was performed to evaluate the safety of vitacoxib in male and female rats for long-term.

The therapeutic benefits of Greenshell™ mussel (GSM; Perna canaliculus) preparations have been studied using in vitro test systems, animal models, and human clinical trials focusing mainly on anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects.

Activity is thought to be linked to key active ingredients that include omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, a variety of carotenoids and other bioactive compounds.

OBJECTIVE: Reporting the rate of positive (+) and negative (-) responders based on an objective outcome measure of pain-related functional disability/lameness in dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA), and the relationship between initial lameness severity and the odds of being a (+) responder.

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of published peer-reviewed clinical trials in dogs with naturally occurring OA.
ANIMALS: Dogs (n = 213) with hip and/or stifle afflicted-joints.

A literature review identified six placebo-controlled studies of analgesics in client-owned cats with degenerative joint disease-associated pain. Five studies with 96 cats had available data. Caregiver responses on a clinical metrology instrument, Client-Specific Outcome Measure (CSOM), were compared to measured activity. Cats were categorised as 'successes' or 'failures' based on change in CSOM score and activity counts from baseline. Effect sizes based on CSOM score were calculated; factors that were associated with success/failure were analysed using logistic regression.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of meloxicam oral transmucosal spray (OTMS) alone and with tramadol in cats with osteoarthritis (OA).

STUDY DESIGN: Randomized, blinded study.

ANIMALS: Fifteen geriatric cats weighing 4.5 ± 1.0 kg.

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to (1) compare outcome assessments in normal and osteoarthritic cats and (2) evaluate the analgesic efficacy of tramadol in feline osteoarthritis (OA), in a prospective, randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design.

OBJECTIVES: Anatomical and methodological detail is lacking regarding local anesthetic peripheral nerve block techniques for distal pelvic limb surgery in cats. The aim of this study was to develop, describe and test nerve block methods based on cadaveric dissections and dye injections.

BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of grapiprant for treatment of pain in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA).

HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: Grapiprant will relieve pain as measured by the owner's and veterinarian's evaluation of pain in dogs with OA. Another objective was evaluation of the safety of grapiprant.

ANIMALS: Two hundred and eighty-five client-owned dogs with OA were enrolled and treated with grapiprant or placebo with 262 cases (N = 131 in each group) evaluable for the effectiveness analysis.