Arthritis

OBJECTIVE: Reporting the rate of positive (+) and negative (-) responders based on an objective outcome measure of pain-related functional disability/lameness in dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA), and the relationship between initial lameness severity and the odds of being a (+) responder.

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of published peer-reviewed clinical trials in dogs with naturally occurring OA.
ANIMALS: Dogs (n = 213) with hip and/or stifle afflicted-joints.

A literature review identified six placebo-controlled studies of analgesics in client-owned cats with degenerative joint disease-associated pain. Five studies with 96 cats had available data. Caregiver responses on a clinical metrology instrument, Client-Specific Outcome Measure (CSOM), were compared to measured activity. Cats were categorised as 'successes' or 'failures' based on change in CSOM score and activity counts from baseline. Effect sizes based on CSOM score were calculated; factors that were associated with success/failure were analysed using logistic regression.

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the intra- and inter-observer measurement variability of an existing osteoarthritis (OA) stifle scoring system.

METHODS: Paired caudocranial and mediolateral canine stifle radiographs were selected randomly. A total of 15 assessment points were evaluated independently and graded twice (integer numeric scale: 1-4) at an interval of 2 weeks by three observers with different levels of experience. The grades for each of the 15 factors were summed to obtain the OA score for each patient.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of meloxicam oral transmucosal spray (OTMS) alone and with tramadol in cats with osteoarthritis (OA).

STUDY DESIGN: Randomized, blinded study.

ANIMALS: Fifteen geriatric cats weighing 4.5 ± 1.0 kg.

OBJECTIVES: Feline osteoarthritis causes pain and disability. Detection and measurement is challenging, relying heavily on owner report. This study describes refinement of the Montreal Instrument for Cat Arthritis Testing, for Use by Veterinarians.

Category: Arthritis

Feline stifle osteoarthritis (OA) is common, however little is known about the early stages of the disease. Furthermore, the importance of small articular mineralizations (AMs) in feline stifle OA is controversial. This study aimed to describe microscopic articular cartilage lesions and to investigate associations between cartilage lesions and AMs, synovitis, osteochondral junction findings and subchondral bone sclerosis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic, degenerative disease affecting the articular cartilage and subchondral bone that causes pain and inhibits movement. The stifle's joint fibrous capsule contains the synovial membrane, which produces cartilage nutrients. A ruptured cranial cruciate ligament injures the joint and produces OA.

Degenerative joint disease is common in cats, with signs of pain frequently found on orthopedic examination and radiographs often showing evidence of disease. However, understanding of the pathophysiology of degenerative joint disease and associated pain remains limited. Several cytokines have been identified as having a role in pain in humans, but this has not been investigated in cats.

The elbow joint is one of the feline appendicular joints most commonly and severely affected by degenerative joint disease. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions of the elbow joints of 30 adult cats were evaluated immediately after euthanasia.

BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of grapiprant for treatment of pain in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA).

HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: Grapiprant will relieve pain as measured by the owner's and veterinarian's evaluation of pain in dogs with OA. Another objective was evaluation of the safety of grapiprant.

ANIMALS: Two hundred and eighty-five client-owned dogs with OA were enrolled and treated with grapiprant or placebo with 262 cases (N = 131 in each group) evaluable for the effectiveness analysis.