Arthroscopy

Authors: Dutton TA1, Gurney MA, Bright SR.
Journal: J Small Anim Pract

OBJECTIVES:

To document efficacy of intra-articular mepivacaine in dogs based on the hypothesis that this would blunt the haemodynamic response to a nociceptive stimulus (arthroscopic surgery), reducing interventional analgesia requirements.

METHODS:

Authors: Ridge PA1, Cook JL, Cook CR.
Journal: Vet Surg

OBJECTIVE:

To report short and medium term outcomes, and complications, in dogs treated for rupture of the lateral glenohumeral ligament (LGHL) with a novel, arthroscopically assisted technique.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS:

Dogs (n = 10) with LGHL injury.

METHODS:

Category: Arthroscopy - Shoulder
Authors: Mariee IC1, Gröne A2, Theyse LF3.
Journal: Vet J

Coronoid dysplasia (CD) or medial coronoid disease is part of canine elbow dysplasia and eventually results in osteoarthrosis. Although CD was originally attributed to disturbed endochondral ossification, more recent data point to the subchondral bone. The objective of this study was to assess dysplastic bone and cartilage of dogs that underwent unilateral or bilateral arthroscopic subtotal coronoidectomy for the treatment of CD. Arthroscopic findings and histopathology of bone and cartilage removed from elbow joints with CD were compared.

Authors: Rodriguez-Quiros J1, Rovesti GL, Devesa V, Urrutia PG, Roman FS.
Journal: JSAP

OBJECTIVE:
To evaluate the technical feasibility, efficacy and potential soft tissue damage of a joint distraction technique to facilitate arthroscopy of the tibio-tarsal joint and to test the effect of joint venting on the maximum distraction achieved.
METHODS:

Category: Arthroscopy - Hock
Authors: Farrell M1, Heller J, Solano M, Fitzpatrick N, Sparrow T, Kowaleski M.
Journal: Vet Surg

OBJECTIVE:
To compare radiographic elbow arthrosis with arthroscopic cartilage pathology in Labrador retrievers with elbow osteoarthritis secondary to medial coronoid process (MCP) disease.
STUDY DESIGN:
Retrospective epidemiological study.
ANIMALS:
Labrador retrievers (n = 317; 592 elbow joints).
METHODS:

Category: Arthroscopy - Elbow - Imaging
Authors: Perry KL, Li L.
Journal: VCOT

Arthroscopy is the gold standard for articular surface examination and is commonly advocated for diagnosing and treating cases of canine elbow dysplasia. Arthroscopy is generally regarded as a low-risk procedure, however there is a paucity of information in the small animal veterinary literature regarding the associated complication rates. In a retrospective study spanning a ten year period, 750 elective elbow arthroscopies were evaluated. Complications necessitating repeat surgery were defined as major, and were documented in 4.8% of dogs.

Category: Arthroscopy - Elbow
Authors: Coggeshall JD, Reese DJ, Kim SE, Pozzi A.
Journal: JSAP

Four skeletally immature, small breed dogs (five elbows) with elbow incongruency were evaluated for forelimb lameness. Findings on clinical examination included pain, effusion and decreased range of motion of the affected elbow. Radiography, computed tomography and arthroscopy demonstrated elbow incongruency in all dogs. Fragmented medial coronoid process was diagnosed arthroscopically in three dogs (four elbows). Arthroscopic subtotal coronoidectomy was performed in all cases of fragmented medial coronoid process.

Authors: de Bakker E, Samoy Y, Coppieters E, Mosselmans L, Van Ryssen B.
Journal: VCOT

Objectives: To investigate the possibilities and limitations of arthroscopy to detect flexor enthesopathy in dogs and to distinguish the primary from the concomitant form. Materials and methods: Fifty dogs (n = 94 elbow joints) were prospectively studied: dogs with primary flexor enthesopathy (n = 29), concomitant flexor enthesopathy (n = 36), elbow dysplasia (n = 18), and normal elbow joints (n = 11). All dogs underwent an arthroscopic examination of one or both elbow joints.

Authors: Franklin SP, Devitt CM, Ogawa J, Ridge P, Cook JL.
Journal: Vet Surg

OBJECTIVES:
To describe demographic factors, treatments, and outcomes associated with shoulder instability in dogs.
STUDY DESIGN:
Multi-center, retrospective cohort study.
ANIMALS:
Dog (n = 130) with shoulder instability.
METHODS:

Authors: Plesman R, Gilbert P, Campbell J.
Journal: VCOT

Objectives: To evaluate and compare detection of meniscal tears associated with cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency by either arthroscopy or arthrotomy.Methods: A retrospective, cohort study was completed with stifles (n = 531) of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Either a medial parapatellar arthrotomy or an arthroscopy procedure was performed and groups were compared for significant differences in meniscal tears detected using logistic regression analysis.Results: Arthroscopy was performed on 58.8% and arthrotomy on 41.2% of the stifles.