Osteochondrosis

Authors: A. Ricard, M. Perrocheau, A. Couroucé-Malblanc, J.P. Valette, G. Tourtoulou, J.M. Dufosset, C. Robert, S. Chaffaux, J.M. Denoix, G. Guérin
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

Juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) have been defined as lesions resulting from biomechanical influences (compressive, tensional or shear forces) on the developing and growing musculoskeletal system. They include different types of osteochondrosis, osteochondral fragmentation of the articular surface or of the periarticular margins, juvenile subchondral bone cysts, osteochondral collapse, avulsion fractures of epiphyseal (or metaphyseal) ossifying bone and ‘physitis’.

Category: Equine - Osteochondrosis
Authors: Anne Praud, Barbara Dufour, Céline Robert, Jean-Paul Valette, Jean-Marie Denoix, Nathalie Crevier-Denoix
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

Several studies have demonstrated a statistical association between management practices and juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) in foals from birth to 6 months of age, but this association has not been investigated in yearlings. The purpose of the current study was to determine the adjusted effects of management practices on the onset and evolution of JOCC in French yearlings. The study sample consisted of 259 yearlings born on 20 stud farms in Normandy. The breeding conditions of these horses were monitored from 6 to 17 months.

Authors: Johanna Lepeule, Nathalie Bareille, Céline Robert, Jean-Paul Valette, Sandrine Jacquet, Géraldine Blanchard, Jean-Marie Denoix, Henri Seegers
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for the severity of Juvenile OsteoChondral Conditions (JOCC) in limbs of French foals. Twenty-one farms in Normandy, France, were sampled and enrolled in a cohort study including 378 foals from three breeds, followed from the 8th month of pregnancy of the mares until the foals were approximately 6 months old. Data on growth, feeding practices and exercise conditions were regularly collected. The carpus, the front and hind digits, the hock and the stifle of the foals were radiographed at the end of follow-up.

Category: Equine - Osteochondrosis
Authors: S. Jacquet, C. Robert, J.-P. Valette, J.-M. Denoix
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

The objective of this study was to evaluate the spontaneous evolution of radiological findings (RF) indicative of juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) in a field study. A radiographic survey was performed at the age of 6 and 18 months in 321 young horses from three breeds (French Trotter Standardbred, Selle-Français Warmblood and Thoroughbred). Each RF identified at 6 months was re-evaluated at 18 months, and classified as (1) disappeared, (2) improved, (3) stable, (4) deteriorated or (5) new when it was not identified at 6 months.

Category: Equine - Osteochondrosis
Authors: Johanna Lepeule, Céline Robert, Nathalie Bareille, Jean-Paul Valette, Sandrine Jacquet, Henri Seegers, Jean-Marie Denoix
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

The validity of methods used to score the severity of radiographic findings (RFs) in horses is uncertain since only one or two joints are usually studied, classification criteria are heterogeneous and the internal validity is not assessed. The aim of this study was to assess the internal validity of a severity scoring system (SSS) of RFs by repeated scoring of a sample of radiographs.

Category: Equine - Osteochondrosis
Authors: J.-M. Denoix, S. Jacquet, J. Lepeule, N. Crevier-Denoix, J.-P. Valette, C. Robert
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

Radiographic examination in young horses is commonly used to detect juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC). The aim of this study is to present the radiographic findings (RF) detected at the age of 6 months in the joints of 392 foals from three breeds: French Trotter Standardbreds (FT), Selle-Français Warmbloods (SF) and Thoroughbreds (TB). Radiographic examination included lateromedial views of the fore and hind digits, tarsi and stifles, and dorsopalmar projections of both carpi. In all areas RF indicative of JOCC were classified according to a four-grade severity scoring system.

Category: Equine - Osteochondrosis
Authors: Céline Robert, Jean-Paul Valette, Sandrine Jacquet, Johanna Lepeule, Jean-Marie Denoix
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

The possible aetiology of osteochondrosis and, to a lesser extent, other developmental orthopaedic diseases or juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC), has been intensively investigated. However, most studies have focused on single factors of this multi-factorial disorder, or have been conducted under experimental conditions. This paper aims to present and discuss the scientific background of the BOSAC (Breeding, Osteochondral Status and Athletic Career) research program, a multi-factorial investigation on JOCC risk factors in field conditions.

Category: Equine - Osteochondrosis
Authors: J.-M. Denoix, L.B. Jeffcott, C.W. McIlwraith, P.R. van Weeren
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

This manuscript describes a new classification of the various joint-related lesions that can be seen in the young, growing horse based on their anatomical and functional aetiopathogenesis. Juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) is a term that brings together specific disorders according to their location in the joint and their biomechanical origin.

Category: Equine - Osteochondrosis
Authors: C. Wayne McIlwraith
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

The paper reviews current knowledge on conservative versus surgical options for the treatment of osteochondrosis entities in the horse. Clinical and radiographic signs of each significant osteochondrosis entity in the horse are presented, followed by the value of conservative treatment versus arthroscopic surgery options as well as the results for each option with the various entities. The entities presented in detail include, osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the femoropatellar, tarsocrural, metacarpophalangeal and metatarsophalangeal, and glenohumural articulations.

Category: Equine - Osteochondrosis
Authors: Ottmar Distl
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

Osteochondrosis (OC) develops in growing horses due to disturbed differentiation and maturation of cartilage, particularly at the predilection sites of the fetlock, hock and stifle joints. Horses with osteochondrotic lesions are at a high risk of developing orthopaedic problems later in life. This article briefly reviews the published heritability estimates for OC and offers perspectives for selection in the horse industry. Heritabilities for OC in Warmblood and Standardbred horses have been estimated at 0.1–0.4 in animal threshold models.

Category: Equine - Osteochondrosis