Septic (teno)synovitis

Authors: Simon E. Hennessy MVB*, Lucy Cudmore BVSc, L. Paige Jackson DVM, MS, James R. Vasey BVSc, DVS, FACVSc, Thomas Russell BVMS, MACVSc, Diplomate ECVS
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective
To (1) develop an arthroscopic approach to the subextensorius recess of the lateral femorotibial (LFT) joint in foals and (2) report its use in foals with LFT joint sepsis.
Study Design
(1) Anatomic study and (2) retrospective case series.
Sample Population
(1) Cadaveric hind limbs (n = 32 foals) to delineate the anatomy of the subextensorius recess; 13 foal limbs for cadaver surgery to assess the approach to the subextensorius recess; and (2) foals (n = 8) with LFT joint sepsis.
Methods

Authors: Sara D. Lawhon, Deanna A. Sutton, Natalie D. Halbert, Jeffrey P. Watkins
Journal: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

Two months following the surgical repair of an acute, open, comminuted, and articular fracture of the left olecranon, a 15-year-old American Saddlebred gelding presented with nonweight-bearing lameness. A fungus cultured from the cubital joint was identified as Scedosporium prolificans by sequencing of the D2 large subunit ribosomal DNA region and subsequently confirmed by phenotypic methods. Therapy with systemic fluconazole, terbinafine and intra-articular voriconazole was attempted, but was unsuccessful.

Authors: LORRIE GASCHEN, ALEXANDRE LEROUX, JESSICA TRICHEL, LAURA RIGGS, HERMAN H. BRAGULLA, NATHALIE RADEMACHER and DANIEL RODRIGUEZ
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of foals with infectious and noninfectious arthritis are described. Six foals with infectious arthritis and three foals with noninfectious arthritis were grouped based on synovial fluid analysis results and examined with radiography and MR imaging. Four out of six foals with infectious arthritis had osseous lesions in MR images indicative of osteomyelitis and only 4/19 lesions were detected on digital radiographs. The three foals with noninfectious arthritis had no osseous lesions in MR images or radiographically.

Authors: JEREMIAH T. EASLEY, MATTHEW T. BROKKEN, CHAD J. ZUBROD, ALISON J. MORTON, KATHERINE S. GARRETT, SHANNON P. HOLMES
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

Fourteen horses with septic arthritis underwent high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Septic arthritis was diagnosed based on results from historical and clinical findings, synovial fluid analyses and culture, and radiographic, ultrasonographic, arthroscopic, and histopathologic findings.

Authors: P. R. Morresey, K. S. Garrett, D. Carter
Journal: Equine Veterinary Education

This case report describes a 3-month-old female Thoroughbred foal that presented following the acute onset of apparent respiratory distress, abnormal head carriage and severe neurological deficits referable to the brainstem or cranial cervical spinal cord. Ultrasonography revealed an abscessing pneumonia. Radiographs did not show evidence of bony pathology at the atlanto-occipital region, an area consistent with the observed neurological deficits.

Authors: M. J. Annear, M. O. Furr, N. A. White 2nd
Journal: Equine Veterinary Education

In the neonatal foal septic arthritis is an important cause of morbidity that may limit future athletic performance. This is often despite a good prognosis for resolution of joint infection. This article presents a review of the diagnosis and treatment of septic arthritis in foals less than 2 months of age, including an overview of our current understanding of inflammatory joint disease in the neonate. Management options are described, with emphasis on tailoring therapy to the individual foal based on accurate staging and monitoring of the disease process.

Authors: M. DUMOULIN, F. PILLE, A.-M. Van Den ABEELE, F. BOYEN, B. BOUSSAUW, M. OOSTERLINCK, F. PASMANS, F. GASTHUYS, A. MARTENS
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: Standard methods for culturing equine synovial fluid (SF) are often unrewarding. Evidence-based information on the relative efficiency of different systems used for optimisation of isolation of microorganisms from equine SF is lacking.

Objectives: To compare the results of different culture systems performed in parallel on SF samples from horses clinically diagnosed with synovial sepsis.

Authors: A. H. TAYLOR*, T. S. MAIR † , L. J. SMITH †‡ and J. D. PERKINS
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: The influence of synovial fluid culture on short- and long-term prognosis of cases with septic synovitis requires study.

Hypotheses: Horses with a positive bacterial culture from septic synovial fluid are less likely to survive or return to successful athletic function than those with a negative bacterial culture from septic synovial fluid.