Podiatry

Authors: Jennifer A. Schleining, DVM, MS; Scott R. McClure, DVM, PhD; Timothy R. Derrick, PhD; Chong Wang, PhD
Journal: American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective—To evaluate the ability of industrial polystyrene foam insulation pads to redistribute loads placed on clinically normal weight-bearing structures of the foot and shift the location of the center of pressure palmarly in horses. Animals—25 nonlame mature horses. Procedures—Both forefeet from each horse were evaluated. Center of pressure data and solar load distribution patterns were recorded during a 5-second trial by use of a commercial pressure measurement system prior to placement of foam sole support and at 0, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after placement.

Category: Equine - Podiatry
Authors: Babak Faramarzi, DVM, PhD; Antonio M. Cruz, DVM, MVM, MSc, DrMedVet; William C. Sears, MSc, MS
Journal: American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective—To quantify changes in hoof wall strain distribution associated with exercise and time in Standardbreds.

Animals—18 young adult Standardbreds.

Authors: S. J. DYSON, C. A. TRANQUILLE, S. N. COLLINS, T. D. H. PARKIN, R. C. MURRAY
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: There is little scientific evidence to support the premise that poor foot conformation predisposes to foot pain and lameness.

Objectives: To determine relationships between external characteristics of the hoof capsule and angles of the distal phalanx; to determine variability in shape of the distal phalanx; and to investigate association between distal phalanx angles and the injury causing lameness.

Category: Equine - Lameness - Podiatry
Authors: S. E. O'Grady, H. H. Castelijns
Journal: Equine Veterinary Education

The strong association between sheared heels and a spontaneous quarter crack is hard to ignore. Although inappropriate farriery may play a role, limb conformation and the landing pattern of the horse appear to be the dominant factors causing this type of hoof capsule deformation. The importance of determining the underlying cause and implementing the appropriate farriery cannot be over emphasised when managing a quarter crack associated with a sheared heel.

Category: Equine - Podiatry
Authors: N.J. Evans, R.W. Blowey, D. Timofte, D.R. Isherwood, J.M. Brown, R. Murray, R.J. Paton, S.D. Carter
Journal: Veterinary Record

This study describes the association between bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) treponemes and three ‘non-healing’ bovine hoof horn lesions, namely, ‘toe necrosis’ (TN), ‘non-healing white line disease’ (nhWLD) and ‘non-healing sole ulcer’ (nhSU), which are disorders that involve penetration through the horn capsule to involve the corium.

Category: Podiatry - Ruminant
Authors: P. I. Milner
Journal: Equine Veterinary Education

Penetrating injuries of the foot are extremely common in equine practice. Most are managed conservatively with generally a good prognosis but there is always the concern that any foot penetration can have the potential to involve deeper structures resulting in life-threatening complications. It is therefore essential that the veterinarian has a sound working knowledge of anatomy and understands the risks of potential sequelae from the earliest possible moment.

Authors: Richard A. Mansmann VMD, PhD, Hon DACVIM-LA; M. Claire Currie DVM; Maria T. Correa PhD Barbara Sherman DVM, PhD, DACVB and Kurt vom Orde
Journal: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

Although foot pain may clearly be the cause when a horse with foot pathology does not tolerate farriery, it may be overlooked or underappreciated as the cause of this behavioral problem when the pathology is mild and/or chronic. In this study, the records of 11 adult horses whose behavior for farriery initially warranted sedation for trimming and shoeing were reviewed. All 11 horses had a history of chronic lameness that was mild to moderate, but foot pain was the presenting complaint in only seven horses - all with chronic laminitis.

Category: Equine - Podiatry
Authors: A. Ronchetti, BVetMed, MRCVS, P. Day, DipWCF and R. Weller, DVetMed, PhD, MRCVS
Journal: The Veterinary Record

Horses that had been trimmed and shod by apprentice farriers were sourced from the Royal School of Military Engineering, Melton Mowbray (37 horses) and from the Household Cavalry, Knightsbridge (54 horses). The lateral and medial hoof wall angles of both forelimbs were measured using a Ruidoso hoof gauge by the same operator. The difference between the lateral and medial hoof wall angles for each horse was calculated and the results were compared between right-handed and left-handed farriers using the Mann-Whitney U test (P<0.05).

Category: Equine - Podiatry
Authors: Richard A. Mansmann, Sarah James, Anthony T. Blikslager, Kurt vom Orde
Journal: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

This study deals with the relationship between long toes in the hind feet and pain in the gluteal region in horses, and the remedial value of trimming/shoeing that moves the breakover point back at the toe. Seventy seven client-owned horses were studied, 67 shod riding horses retrospectively and 10 barefoot broodmares prospectively. The 10 mares were evaluated twice, and 24 of the 67 riding horses were re-evaluated at the next shoeing, for a total of 111 observations. Each horse underwent gluteal palpation and lateral radiographs of both hind feet.

Category: Equine - Podiatry
Authors: Andrea E. Floyd DVM
Journal: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

Negative palmar angle syndrome refers to the condition of progressive heel collapse and its consequences on gait and performance. Treatment and prognosis are facilitated by grading the severity of biomechanical disorder according to physical and radiographic features. Although negative palmar angle syndrome in grades I (mild) and II (moderate) can be corrected with trimming and routine shoeing, grades III (severe) and IV (complicated by flexor contracture) require more intensive mechanical intervention and patience—however, comfort and function can be improved immediately.

Category: Equine - Podiatry