MRI

Authors: S. A. VALLANCE, R. J. W. BELL, M. SPRIET, P. H. KASS, S. M. PUCHALSKI
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: No previous study compares computed tomography (CT), contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) and standing low-field magnetic resonance imaging (LFMRI) to detect lesions in horses with lameness localised to the foot. This study will help clinicians understand the limitations of these techniques.

Objectives: To determine if CT, CECT and LFMRI would identify lesions within the distal limb and document discrepancies with lesion distribution and lesion classification.

Category: Comparative Study - CT - Equine - MRI
Authors: CAROLINA I. URRACA DEL JUNCO, TIM S. MAIR, SARAH E. POWELL, PETER I. MILNER, ALEX F. FONT, TOBIAS SCHWARZ, MARTIN P. WEAVER
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features, signalment, clinical history and outcome of 55 horses with a penetrating sole injury were evaluated. Our aim was to describe MR imaging findings within the hoof capsule, assess the utility of the technique and give recommendations for the optimal MR imaging protocol to evaluate such injuries. Data from five equine hospitals were analyzed retrospectively. The tract was more likely to be visualized in animals scanned within the first week postinjury. There was no significant predisposition based on breed, age, or gender.

Category: Equine - MRI - Traumatology
Authors: Richard L. Griffin, Alexia L. McKnight, Amy Rucker, Scott D. Bennett, Deana M. Fiser
Journal: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

Plain radiographic imaging inadequately identifies soft-tissue pathology and only distinguishes chronic laminitis after the development of notable displacement of the distal phalanx. The window of opportunity for maximum response to treatment occurs before biomechanical failure of the lamellar attachment. Radiographic and magnetic resonance venograms allow vascular assessment of patients affected with acute laminitis.

Category: Equine - Laminitis - MRI
Authors: CAROLINA I. URRACA DEL JUNCO, DARREN J. SHAW, MARTIN P. WEAVER and TOBIAS SCHWARZ
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

Magnetic susceptibility artifacts as a result of metal debris from shoeing are a common problem in magnetic resonance imaging of the equine foot. Our purpose was to determine the suitability of radiography as a screening tool for the presence and location of metallic particles in the equine foot and to predict the size of the resultant magnetic susceptibility artifact. Radiography had 100% sensitivity for detection of metal particles ≥1 mm diameter.

Authors: LORRIE GASCHEN, ALEXANDRE LEROUX, JESSICA TRICHEL, LAURA RIGGS, HERMAN H. BRAGULLA, NATHALIE RADEMACHER and DANIEL RODRIGUEZ
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of foals with infectious and noninfectious arthritis are described. Six foals with infectious arthritis and three foals with noninfectious arthritis were grouped based on synovial fluid analysis results and examined with radiography and MR imaging. Four out of six foals with infectious arthritis had osseous lesions in MR images indicative of osteomyelitis and only 4/19 lesions were detected on digital radiographs. The three foals with noninfectious arthritis had no osseous lesions in MR images or radiographically.

Authors: SUE DYSON, ANNAMARIA NAGY, RACHEL MURRAY
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

Eight sports horses with unilateral (4) or bilateral (3) forelimb or unilateral hindlimb (1) lameness had subtle radiologic abnormalities of the subchondral bone of the sagittal groove of the proximal phalanx associated with moderate or intense increased radiopharmaceutical uptake. High-field or low-field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging confirmed the presence of a fissure fracture or subchondral and trabecular bone trauma. Seven of eight lesions were located approximately midway between the dorsal and palmar cortices of the proximal phalanx; the eighth was sited more dorsally.

Authors: Thomas O'Brien, Theresa A. Baker, Sabrina H. Brounts, Susannah J. Sample, Mark D. Markel, Mary C. Scollay, Patricia Marquis and Peter Muir
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

To compare digital radiography (DR), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of pathology of the distal aspect of the third metacarpal bone (MC3) and to assess whether arthrography would improve detection of articular cartilage or subchondral bone cracking.
Study Design
Cross-sectional study.
Sample Population
Limb specimens from 17 Thoroughbred horses after catastrophic injury and 4 age-matched control horses.
Methods

Authors: S. A. VALLANCE, R. J. W. BELL, M. SPRIET, P. H. KASS, S. M. PUCHALSKI
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: To date, few reports exist comparing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for imaging of the equine distal limb, yet clinicians are required to decide which modality to use regularly.

Objectives: To report and compare anatomic visualisation scores obtained for CT, contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and standing low-field MRI (LFMRI) in the equine foot.

Hypothesis: Anatomic visualisation score discrepancies would exist between CT, CECT and LFMRI.

Authors: A. NAGY, S. DYSON
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: Detailed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological appearances of the proximal aspect of the suspensory ligament (PSL) in the forelimb of nonlame horses have not been previously documented.

Category: Equine - Ligament - MRI
Authors: SANTIAGO D. GUTIERREZ-NIBEYRO, NATASHA M. WERPY, NATHANIEL A. WHITE II, L. JILL McCUTCHEON, HSIN-YI WENG, JOHN M. CHRISTOPHER
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

High- and low-field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems are available for clinical diagnosis of collateral desmopathy of the equine distal interphalangeal joint (DIJ). Knowledge of the normal appearance, size, shape, and signal variation of these ligaments on high- and low-field MR images is essential when assessing desmopathy detected by MR imaging. However, there are no descriptions of the normal features of DIJ collateral ligaments on images obtained with a standing low-field MR system.

Category: Equine - Ligament - MRI