Gait analysis

Authors: Nauwelaerts, S.; Clayton, H.M.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: Estimates of the position of the centres of mass (CM) of body segments are usually extrapolated relative to bony landmarks as determined in cadaver studies. This extrapolation assumes that segments are rigid bodies. Since the trunk represents a large percentage of the total body mass in horses, violation of the rigid body assumption by the trunk segment has important consequences for studying the biomechanics of equine locomotion.

Category: Equine - Gait analysis
Authors: Parkes, R.S.V.; Weller, R.; Groth, A.M.; May, S.; Pfau, T.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: Visual assessment of horses' movements is subjective, affected by bias and dependent on the level of experience of the assessor. However, to date there are no data available on the ability of the human visual system to recognise (a)symmetry in moving objects.

Objectives: To investigate, using visual lameness assessment, the limits of human perception and the ability of experienced and nonexperienced individuals to detect asymmetry in 2 moving objects simulating hindlimb lameness in the horse.

Authors: H. M. Clayton, A. D. White, L. J. Kaiser, S. Nauwelaerts, M. Lavagnino, N. C. Stubbs
Journal: Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology

A lightweight bracelet that provides tactile stimulation to the horse’s pastern and coronet induces a higher flight arc of the hoof. This study addresses the pattern of habituation to these devices. Objective: To evaluate short-term habituation to tactile stimulation of the pastern and coronet in trotting horses. Methods: Tactile stimulation was provided by a lightweight (55 g) device consisting of a strap with seven chains that was attached loosely around the pastern.

Category: Equine - Gait analysis
Authors: Michael A. Weishaupt DrMedVet, PhD
Journal: Veterinary Clinics Equine Practice

The skill to diagnose lamenesses in horses is paramount for every equine practitioner. Early recognition of locomotor deficiencies plays a central role in sports medicine management, preventing deterioration of the disease or catastrophic injuries. Horses use characteristic compensatory movements of specific body parts to decrease loading of the affected limb. This article describes the underlying changes in intra- and interlimb coordination and the resulting load redistribution between the limbs.

Authors: Jeffrey J. Thomason, PhD; Michael L. Peterson, PhD
Journal: Veterinary Clinics Equine Practice

The aim of this article is to review current knowledge of kinetic variables of the hoof-track interaction and track properties relevant to the objective of minimizing injuries to horses at racing tracks. In each phase of the stance-primary impact, secondary impact, support, and breakover, the hoof experiences different combinations of force and acceleration. The role of each combination, and of measured track properties, in causing catastrophic and chronic injuries to the limbs of racing horses is unknown.

Authors: Gomez Alvarez, C.B.; Bobbert, M.F.; Lamers, L.; Johnston, C.; Back, W.; van Weeren, P.R.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Abstract:Reasons for performing study: There are no detailed studies describing a relationship between hindlimb lameness and altered motion of the back.  Objectives: To quantify the effect of induced subtle hindlimb lameness on thoracolumbar kinematics in the horse.