Gait analysis

Authors: S Starke, J Merritt, N Stubbs, T Pfau and H Clayton
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Introduction

The mechanics of circular locomotion are relevant to equine training and lameness evaluation. Circular trotting is associated with asymmetries in upper body movement. This study investigated whether changes in foot placement explain upper body asymmetry and whether this asymmetry is dependent on centripetal force.

Category: Equine - Gait analysis
Authors: S Starke, S May and T Pfau
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Introduction

Lungeing is part of the standard lameness examination, however it systematically affects movement symmetry even in sound horses. We evaluated a method for objective lameness detection on the circle accounting for this asymmetry bias.

Authors: Jose L. Mendez-Angulo, Anna M. Firshman, Donna M. Groschen, Philip J. Kieffer, Troy N. Trumble
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three footing surfaces on the flexion/extension, and range of motion (ROM) of the carpus, tarsus and fetlocks in the horse. The percentage of stride spent in the stance phase of sound horses at the walk was also measured. Nine sound horses were walked on hard ground (HD), soft ground (SF) and a land treadmill (LT), and five complete gait cycles were recorded by a digital video camera.

Category: Equine - Gait analysis
Authors: J. E. Symons, T. C. Garcia and S. M. Stover
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study

The effect of racetrack surface (dirt or synthetic) on distal hindlimb kinematics of racehorses running at competition speeds is not known.
Objectives

To compare distal hindlimb and hoof kinematics during stance of breezing (unrestrained gallop) racehorses between dirt and synthetic surfaces.
Study design

Two-dimensional kinematic video analysis of 5 Thoroughbred racehorses galloping at high speeds (12–17 m/s) on a dirt racetrack and a synthetic racetrack.
Methods

Category: Equine - Gait analysis
Authors: C. Brocklehurst, R. Weller, T. Pfau
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

Turning is commonly used as a diagnostic aid in equine lameness examinations. Forces experienced on the circle differ from those in a straight line, necessitating an inward lean of the body and asymmetric head/pelvic excursion, which are important parameters for lameness investigations. To better understand gait adaptations to lungeing in normal horses, the effect of turn direction on body lean in trot and in canter warrants further investigation.

Category: Equine - Gait analysis
Authors: N. Crevier-Denoix, S. Falala, L. Holden-Douilly, M. Camus, J. Martino, B. Ravary-Plumioen, C. Vergari, L. Desquilbet, J.-M. Denoix, H. Chateau and P. Pourcelot
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Summary
Reasons for performing study

The relationship between track surface properties and limb kinematics is poorly understood. Hoof orientation within the track surface has never been quantified under training conditions. Previously described kinematic and dynamic differences between leading and trailing forelimbs at the canter poorly correlate with epidemiological data regarding injuries.
Objectives

To compare joint kinematics and hoof orientation in the leading and trailing forelimbs of horses cantering on turf and on a synthetic surface.
Study design

Category: Equine - Gait analysis
Authors: S. Maliye, L. Voute, D. Lund and J. F. Marshall
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Summary
Reasons for performing study

In order for changes in lameness to be accurately and repeatably detected and recorded during diagnostic investigations, an objective measure of lameness is required.
Objectives

To ascertain whether an inertial sensor-based system can distinguish between a positive and negative response to diagnostic anaesthesia of the foot and objectively assess the effect of a positive response on the trot.
Study design

Restrospective clinical study.
Methods

Authors: Rachel Murray, Russell Guire, Mark Fisher, Vanessa Fairfax
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

Girths are frequently blamed for veterinary and performance problems, but research into girth/horse interaction is sparse. The study objectives were (1) to determine location of peak pressure under a range of girths, and (2) to compare horse gait between the horse’s standard girth and a girth designed to avoid detected peak pressure locations. In the first part of the study, and following validation procedures, a calibrated pressure mat placed under the girth of 10 horses was used to determine the location of peak pressures. A girth was designed to avoid peak pressure locations (Girth F).

Category: Equine - Gait analysis
Authors: Marina Solé, Maria D. Gómez, Alfonso Martínez Galisteo, Rute Santos, Mercedes Valera
Journal: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

This paper describes the handled walking and trotting kinematics (linear, temporal, and angular traits) of 35 Menorca Purebred (MEN) stallions, and the relationships among these variables is presented for the first time, along with a discussion of the influence of the hind limb pastern angle on kinematic variables at both gaits. For data collection, all animals, aged between 3 and 10 years old and belonging to 28 different studs, were recorded under the same experimental and environmental conditions, using a three-dimensional (3D) semiautomatic movement analysis system.

Category: Equine - Gait analysis
Authors: Sandra D. Starke, Kirsty J. Raistrick, Stephen A. May, Thilo Pfau
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

Equine lameness is a significant and challenging part of a veterinarian’s workload, with subtle lameness inherently difficult to assess. This study investigated the influence of trotting speed on perceived and measured changes in movement asymmetry. Ten sound to mildly lame horses were trotted at a ‘slow’, ‘preferred’ and ‘fast’ speed on a hard surface, both on a straight line and in a circle on left and right reins. Video recordings of the horses were visually assessed by six experienced equine clinicians.