Arthritis

Feline stifle osteoarthritis (OA) is common, however little is known about the early stages of the disease. Furthermore, the importance of small articular mineralizations (AMs) in feline stifle OA is controversial. This study aimed to describe microscopic articular cartilage lesions and to investigate associations between cartilage lesions and AMs, synovitis, osteochondral junction findings and subchondral bone sclerosis.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic, degenerative disease affecting the articular cartilage and subchondral bone that causes pain and inhibits movement. The stifle's joint fibrous capsule contains the synovial membrane, which produces cartilage nutrients. A ruptured cranial cruciate ligament injures the joint and produces OA.

Degenerative joint disease is common in cats, with signs of pain frequently found on orthopedic examination and radiographs often showing evidence of disease. However, understanding of the pathophysiology of degenerative joint disease and associated pain remains limited. Several cytokines have been identified as having a role in pain in humans, but this has not been investigated in cats.

The elbow joint is one of the feline appendicular joints most commonly and severely affected by degenerative joint disease. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions of the elbow joints of 30 adult cats were evaluated immediately after euthanasia.

BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of grapiprant for treatment of pain in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA).

HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: Grapiprant will relieve pain as measured by the owner's and veterinarian's evaluation of pain in dogs with OA. Another objective was evaluation of the safety of grapiprant.

ANIMALS: Two hundred and eighty-five client-owned dogs with OA were enrolled and treated with grapiprant or placebo with 262 cases (N = 131 in each group) evaluable for the effectiveness analysis.

Adenosine triphosphate has been shown to stimulate nociceptive nerve terminals in joints. Elevated synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations as well as a correlation between synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations and osteoarthritic knee pain has been demonstrated in humans, but not yet in dogs.

OBJECTIVE: To record and categorize the outcome measures used in dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA) by systematically reviewing the peer reviewed publications on OA in dogs.

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic literature review.

OBJECTIVE:  To report synovial fluid lactate concentrations in normal and pathological canine joints.

STUDY DESIGN:  Controlled, prospective study.

AIM:  To test whether intra-articular injection of porcine adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can treat canine osteoarthritis (OA).

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of synovial fluid culture in obtaining the causative organism from dogs with suspected septic arthritis.

METHODS: In this retrospective evaluation, synovial fluid cytology and microbiology submissions from dogs with suspected septic arthritis from March 2007 to August 2011 were reviewed. Synovial fluid cytology consistent with joint sepsis was identified. Cultures of synovial fluid from dogs with clinical histories and abnormalities consistent with septic arthritis were used to evaluate the efficacy of bacterial isolation.

Category: Arthritis