Fracture Fixation and Implants

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the use of Kirschner wires for treatment of fractures of the lateral aspect of the humeral condyle in growing dogs.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the stiffness and load to failure of two different ostectomy configurations using canine mandibles.

STUDY DESIGN: Cadaveric biomechanical assessment.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the biomechanical properties of 2 veterinary locking plates and monocortical screws/polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) fixation in canine cadaveric cervical vertebral columns.

STUDY DESIGN: Biomechanical cadaveric study.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the inter- and intra-observer variability in measurement of the angle of lateral opening (ALO) and version angle measurement using digital radiography and computed tomography (CT).

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of intramedullary pin size and plate working length on plate strain in locking compression plate-rod constructs.

OBJECTIVES: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of a novel 1.2 mm mini locking plate system in treating fractures of the radius and ulna in miniature breed dogs.

A two-year-old, 44 kg dog with a right Helica cementless total hip replacement (THR) was radiographically diagnosed with implant loosening eight months after the index total hip replacement procedure. Subsequent synoviocentesis and synovial fluid culture revealed a methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp infection of the right THR.

A one-stage revision using a hybrid BFX cementless acetabular cup and CFX cemented femoral stem was performed. Vancomycin and micro-silver antimicrobial powder impregnated cement were used in the revision.

OBJECTIVE: Monocortical screws are commonly employed in locking plate fixation, but specific recommendations for their placement are lacking and use of short monocortical screws in metaphyseal bone may be contraindicated. Objectives of this study were to evaluate axial pullout strength of two different lengths of monocortical screws placed in various regions of the canine humerus compared to bicortical screws, and to derive cortical thickness and bone density values for those regions using quantitative computed tomography analysis (QCT).

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of complications and describe the outcome associated with calcaneal fractures in non-racing dogs and in cats.

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective multicenter clinical cohort study.

ANIMALS: Medical records of client-owned dogs and cats (2004-2013).

OBJECTIVE: To compare the biomechanical properties of simulated humeral condylar fractures reduced with one of two screw fixation methods: 3.0 mm headless compression screw (HCS) or 3.5 mm cortical bone screw (CBS) placed in lag fashion.

METHODS: Bilateral humeri were collected from nine canine cadavers. Standardized osteotomies were stabilized with 3.0 mm HCS in one limb and 3.5 mm CBS in the contralateral limb. Condylar fragments were loaded to walk, trot, and failure loads while measuring construct properties and condylar fragment motion.